Weather
No-one can accurately predict the weather. Before doing the trip I did some  reading on weather  forecasting, the meaning of  barometric pressure changes  etc. Interesting to note was reference to  a method of forecasting referred to as  "The  Persistence Model". Unlike most forecasting models  that require large  counts of data gatherers, complex processing and  mathematical modelling,  the  Persistence Model requires no data gathering, analysis or modelling and  is believe it or not  statistically more accurate! In essence, the Persistence Model is nothing more than the prediction  that the weather  tomorrow will be  the same as today!
I liked the approach as we started on a fair day. I decided to optimise the  model and referred to it  as the "Optimistic  Persistence Model" suggesting  that the weather tomorrow would be the same  or even better than today!
The weather conformed to this model for the first 7 days! We started out fair and enjoyed sunny  and rainless days. On the  8th day we had cloud and rain  late in the afternoon. On the 9th day, we  had sleet followed by snow for most  of the day  trundling into Sani. This added greatly to the  experience of getting  to highest point in Southern Africa, Thabana Ntanyana,  enjoying the  displays of ice bedecked frozen grasses. Quite spectacular.
Not keen to start the 10th day in sub-zero conditions we were somewhat sceptical about the  weather. True to form, the  model kicked in, the days got better and we rolled through the rest of  the trip in good weather.
A point to note is that the weather conditions and the mood and cohesiveness of the team  appeared to be in sync. Whether  our moods reflected the  weather, or the weather reflected our  moods is anyone's guess. All I can say  is that we were  blessed having 10 out of 12 days of  exceptional weather. I can understand that teams doing the traverse in foul weather  would certainly  be more stressed and challenged than we were.