Team Dynamics
It is often easier to speak of a team than to be one. The team is nothing more than a grouping of  cooperative individuals.
George, as the initiator and "leader" of the group was in a position of  delicate authority. I say  delicate because in a  situation such as this a  leader actually has no authority at all. The ability to  lead hinges purely on  the willingness of all to  accept leadership that is offered. Within a group of  strong willed individuals, some with more experience than others, there  are  times when a  difference of opinion arises. With all the members having  done many hikes before, there were few if  any  who believed they were  dependent on others to complete a days walk or the hike itself. As  such, on certain occasions  multiple groups followed multiple routes despite initial  ground rules  requesting the team stay together. I know of traverses  where  mutiny occurs and the group has  chosen to ignore the leader altogether. In certain scenarios I believe the leader  must exercise a  casting vote and  make the final call if the team does not reach consensus. Other than that, if the  team  functions well, the leader can act as and be the same as any other member of the group.  George did this well. At different  times different members led the way. Route changes were  generally agreed on and consideration was given to the views of  each member.
This raises the point of ground rules for the hike. Apart from agreeing start  times, break times, and  end points for each day,  there is little else to  agree on. Common sense should prevail. If the  weather is fair and  unchanging the group can spread  out over a larger area. If the weather is  changing or poor, the group stresses are better managed by staying close. The  leader has no  authority to expel a member from the team or prevent him from staying with the group. This position  should  not arise if all behave  maturely, managing their own internal conflicts and responses to  others.
Complaining and grumbling are counter productive. Constantly highlighting one's pain or problems  does not achieve  anything. The hike must continue unless severe challenges exist. Aches and  pains are private experiences that should not  be harped on. Address the condition as best as one  can and get on with it.
Team selection is probably one of the most important aspects of traverse  preparation.
Fortunately our group experienced limited challenges from a physical  perspective and the fair  weather prevented major  conflicts associated with  team dynamics. There were some challenges  but maturity prevailed and we moved on beyond the  conflicts.
One of the things we did at the end of most days was to get the team to  come together in a  circular embrace or huddle and  end the days walk. I suggested we should use this time to  symbolically cast our grudges and  negative emotions on the  floor in the circle between us before  we all stamped our feet as a means of putting problems behind us. It was  interesting to  me that  there were days where I had difficulty letting go. I was sometimes reluctant to stamp my foot down  in the circle and  move on. Silly, but interesting.